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End of an era

Discussion in 'Chewing the fat' started by diesel, Oct 11, 2017.

  1. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Sep 23, 2016
    For those who may be unaware, we are coming to the end of 2 stroke carby petrol engines.

    The following text was referenced from boatsales.com.

    The Department of the Environment has announced July 1, 2018, as the date to commence new emission standards for non-road spark ignition engines and equipment (NRSIEE) — which includes all marine engines — with an extended transition of the full implementation of the regulations through to July 2019.

    Manufacturers, importers, and suppliers of NRSIEE should be planning to ensure that they do not have any unsold non-compliant stock in their possession by 1 July 2019.

    In general, four-stroke and direct-injection two-stroke engines are being used to meet the new emission standards for marine.

    Outboards and non-handheld equipment currently using conventional (carby) two-stroke engines are unlikely to meet the requirements of the new emission standards, the Department warns.

    The Australian emission standards will not be retrospective and will only apply to new NRSIEE products brought to Australia or supplied within Australia, not to those that people already own.

    While any price drop on carby two-stroke outboard engines has been ruled out by the big importers — they say they're expensive to produce — the value of second-hand carby engines will drop in the near future. As these old-tech outboards are phased out, trade-in values will likely fall, too. So perhaps you should think about upgrading to a four stroke or direct-injection two stroke sooner rather than later.

    The Department says its key objective is to reduce air pollution from petrol-powered gardening equipment, generators, pumps and marine engines, which are said to be high polluters relative to their size and contribute significantly to outdoor air pollution. Operated in close proximity, users are also subjected to high levels of pollutants, it says.

    A small carby two-stroke engine used for one hour can emit the same emissions of oxides of nitrogen (NOx) as a car, and as much hydrocarbons as 150 cars, when operated over the same period.

    Manufacturers, importers, and suppliers of NRSIEE products should start planning now to bring their product lines into compliance with the new exhaust emission standards. The lead times mean there is approximately 8 months from now until non-compliant NRSIEE can no longer be brought into Australia.

    Full details of the standards to be introduced are available at the Department’s dedicated webpage at www.environment.gov.au/protection/air-quality/publications/working-towards-australian-emission-standards-nrsiee-update-paper.


    Even though the importers state otherwise, maybe we will see some good deals on old stock from some of the dealers. They would sooner sell them than have to destroy them.

    Jeff :cool:
     
    Last edited: Oct 11, 2017
    Ditch, AWL, creekboy and 1 other person like this.
  2. creekboy

    creekboy Well-Known Member

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    Sep 7, 2016
    Love the smell of 2 strokes in the morning. Cheers, creekboy.
     
  3. AWL

    AWL Well-Known Member

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    It's been coming for a while.Probably the biggest effect will be on the small tiller motor end of the market.Anyone wanting new big hp would be looking at going 4 stroke just on fuel economy alone.
    I did a repower on my tinny about 5 years ago.Bought a 25 2st which is max hp. In 4 strokes could only go 20 and not excede max transom weight.
     
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  4. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Sep 23, 2016
    For blokes like myself who live in the bush, a chainsaw is a standard bit of kit and hardly a week goes past where I don't use one. I look after my gear and the 2 saws that I currently have will probably last me the rest of my days, but for those people looking to purchase a new chainsaw after July 2019, they may have a problem. Stihl have a 4 stroke chainsaw that uses a 2 stroke fuel mix to get lubrication to the cylinder and most likely wont meet emission standards, so exemptions may have to be granted for some equipment. Two stroke powered generators wont be a great loss to the world, nor will 2 stroke lawn mowers and motorbikes, but there are some applications where the regulatory framework may cause problems for the end user.

    Jeff :cool:
     
    Last edited: Oct 14, 2017
    AWL, creekboy and kev209 like this.
  5. AWL

    AWL Well-Known Member

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    It's non retrospective so we can keep using the toy's we got till we wear them out:cool:
    Unfortunately,be it bike,boat,chainsaw or whipper snipper,future generations will never get the chance to experience what it's like to grab a handfull of throttle and hear a 2st scream:D:D
    (2st leaf blowers are a tool of the devil,they can inflict personal harm,just ask my neighbour where i used to live)
     
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  6. Sprinter

    Sprinter Active Member

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    Aug 17, 2016
    Apart from the exceptions mentioned I wont miss two stroke outboards. Sound carries a long way on the water and not all two strokes sound good. I do miss 2 stroke racing bikes though.....:(
     
    diesel likes this.

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