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Predicting Fishing Times - What do you use?

Discussion in 'Fishing General Chat' started by Ditch, Oct 10, 2017.

  1. Ditch

    Ditch Member

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    How do you pick the best time to go fishing?. Do you head out depending on the tides or moon phases?

    I used to purchase a "Fishing Almanac" from the newsagent years ago produced by Alvey (small yellow booklet) that gave you the best time to fish or hunt based on the tides & moon phases with major & minor feeding times. Used it a fair bit & kept records in it of catches made & it seemed to be reasonably accurate although I was only fishing inland.

    These days there are apps for smartphones that do the same thing & I have been trialing one to see if it helps. The one I use is Fishing & Hunting Solunar Time - https://play.google.com/store/apps/details?id=com.antonnikitin.solunarforecast&hl=en

    There are other considerations besides the tides & moon, barometric pressure & water temps, sunrise & sunset come into play as well & then there are the old sayings such as "When the winds from the east, the fish bite the least"

    Interested to know how you pick a time to fish or is it just pot luck?
     
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  2. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Up here in the north, Ditch, most of us just rely on a 'gut feeling' based on past experiences of catching or not catching. During the runoff, the fishing gods are kind to us and it doesn't matter all that much at what time of day or night, if there is water, there are big hungry mouths waiting.

    Down south, all those things you mention come into play I guess, especially water temps.

    Jeff :cool:
     
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  3. Ditch

    Ditch Member

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    Pretty much the same here as well. Fish come on the bite in the rivers downstream of the dams when they are releasing water. Heard a few reports from around Gunnedah that the Yellowbelly are on the bite in the Namoi, they started releasing water from Keepit Dam 2 weeks ago.

    Water temp does play a big part in the impoundments, when they hit 28 degrees the yellowbelly bite well & they say that a barometer over 1020 bring the Cod on.

    As for "Gut Feeling", mine must be out of whack, it`s been telling me to go fishing everyday!:)
     
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  4. Bluefin

    Bluefin Active Member

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  5. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    I still use it. I was wondering the other day if it will still be produced with the demise of Alvey. I believe it is worth while. This has been backed up by sitting out on a channel for over 6 hours on an evening and actually witnessing fish activity increase around the period when the moon is directly above or when the moon is on the horizon. Regarding the different 'ratings' in the almanac, I have no doubt they are accurate as well. If a big 'high' is forecast to arrive on a 'black' day (the best rating) then it is the best as far as I am concerned.

    Other things I take into consideration are recent rainfall...I like to get out the day after a decent dump and have a go. Another aspect I want to try is fishing prior to a thunderstorm. I have heard a fair bit about fish going off their nuts but I have not had much luck. On saying that, I have possibly arrived too late and missed the action.

    BUT...if by chance I want to go fishing and forecast conditions are not ideal...meh...who cares. I will still go for some stress relief! You may just have to work a bit harder to get the fish! And I will also say, all of my comments are regarding fresh water fishing.
    cheers
    Jim
     
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  6. Ditch

    Ditch Member

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    Always wonder if tides play a roll in freshwater fishing or is it more to do with moon phases that control the tides?. I seem to do better when there is a new moon above & a high barometer, usually indicating calm conditions that I like for the type of fishing I do (trolling or casting lures amongst the timber, much more enjoyable when it`s calm).

    Got a trip planned for the weekend of the 19, 20, 21 October, the almanac is telling me 92, 89 & 71 % chance on those days. Hopefully the weather will be good as well & I can put the theory to the test. My birthday that weekend as well, so maybe the powers that be may help me out!.

    With the season the way it is at the moment a thunderstorm may be on the cards so might have a chance to test your theory out!

    With you on having a go when the conditions are not ideal, better to be fishing than not!

    Cheers, Ditch.
     
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  7. reelaxation

    reelaxation Well-Known Member

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    Normally I go by season and tide- I know the ting and bream come on later winter and stick around until late spring, plus the Taylor and salmon turn up late winter and stick around until early autumn round my area. Then you got kings, pigs, Bonnie's, Jews, reds and trevs which can turn up anytime and be gone as quick as they came, esp on the beaches.
    So with that in mind I normally try to fish the run up tide sometime between say 4pmish and midnight. I've had very limited success on dropping tides aver the years and the run up and slack tide or first hour or so if the run out seem to produce the best on the beaches.

    I have fished the same beach for near on 20years and in that time a lot has changed... I used to catch blue spot and sand flatties, aswell as big Taylor and salmon most of the year round, with the odd Jew and some dart and trevs thrown in.
    A few years ago I got no salmon and only a few Taylor, no Jews and no flatties, but I have caught more bream and ting than ever before... In this year alone I've caught up to 15 ting in a session and a few bream most which were released from the same beach using the same gear I have used to donkeys years... Goes to show that every few years it changes and species I haven't caught in a while make a come back and the ones I was used to catching disappear for a while. I am yet to find a real pattern but I assume the colder the winter the bigger the run of bream and whiting along the beaches.
    As I haven't fished for 6mths until last week I cannot give an accurate account of what is biting locally so maybe in a few weeks and when I can go regularly I will be able to tell what there and what has left from last time I went out.
     
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  8. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    There's little doubt that the best time to fish is 'WHEN YOU CAN'.

    Mates tell me when the tide is at slack bottom; you might as well go home. I have proven that theory wrong to them numerous times. I once put great faith in rising tides: After living here a few years, I think less about such things, and more about 'where will I fish today'. I have only fished three times this year and don't like that at all. It's about to change. The time on the water is more than just fishing. It also has to do with being at peace with your self, and being in an environment you love.

    At the end of the day, when the sun is being dragged under protestation down to the horizon; the colours of the world are changing every minute, there's a fish in the bag for dinner, I ask; where else would you want to be?

    As I fish lures predominately (99.9% plastics), the other .001% being hard bodies and blades, something inside tells me it's as much, perhaps more, about technique, experience, and seriously working at it than most other theories combined. Colours catch fishermen; fishermen catch fish.

    My greatest belief in the world of fishing is simple. The mug who goes fishing catches more than the expert who stays home.
     
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  9. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I like that Noel, would make a good signature quote.

    Jeff :cool:
     
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  10. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Here's a pic of the 'retreat/resort' at lake Eucumbene. Summer sunsets here can be really special. The fish bits are pretty good too. We've had something like this at the lake for about 30 years.
    DSCF7681.JPG
     
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  11. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    The best times for fishing is when YOU choose. I chose Sunday as a starting point: Virtually everything was checked and fully operational. The repaired relay for the boat winch was fitted, and all worked like a new one, but it had me off the water for another week.
    Gear on board after being carefully checked, lunch box packed, everything organised, I hitched the Jeep to the boat trailer. As always, checked if all trailer lights were working. None were. For the first time since I built the old rig, I had no lights at all on the trailer. So confident was I; they were the only thing unchecked. Grabbed the meter; went looking for the problem, hoping ten minutes would see it all OK. Wrong yet again. After something like 15 years I was never going to get the lights working. The cables were totally black and even connected direct to a battery, current wouldn't flow.
    Of course, in a small town on Sunday; I couldn't get replacement cabling, so fishing was doomed until Monday if I got a good start to rewiring everything.
    After driving 20km, reached Moruya at 8.00am Monday morning; even took a small piece of cable with five wires obviously protruding. The auto electrician said I shouldn't use the original black coloured one. A white one has tinned wire and won't suffer the same fate, so bought that one. Drove home, got all the tools out to have it finished and hit the water at lunch time, then threaded the cable through the trailer chassis. Cut the cover off one end to really get going, and hells bells, there was only three wires, not five. Suddenly not happy.
    Rang the guy in Moruya, who apologised for grabbing the wrong spool and not checking. I didn't want to do another 40km, so he offered to send it with a courier.
    Waiting, waiting, waiting. A workshop ute pulled up and Troy raced in with a roll of cable. He couldn't get a courier so delivered it himself. All good, but it was now after 1.00pm and I'd not started. By the time I had everything operating, it was time to be coming home from fishing, not going out. So yet another lost day.
    Today having new brushes fitted to starter motor in Jeep as a precaution against a suspected failure pending, so Tuesday was now dead. Wednesday is scheduled to do trailer bearings, untouched for years. Then we leave for ten days at Wallaga Lake near Bermagui on Friday, taking the van, then coming back for boat. It's only 40 odd kms away, but Thursday will be pack up day.
    While in theory the best times for fishing ae when you want to; it doesn't always work out as planned. Another week has passed, and still haven't got there. Look out Wallaga Lake, and surely there's nothing else can go wrong.

    But I found that Sam, a young lad I know, chasing Jews the other night on Tuross Lake, had a big run on a line. It seemed like a big Jew for a while, but when netted, it was an 86.5cm snapper. Nobody's heard of one that big in the lake here before. A monster fish. I have seen the pics, and Sam is a fantastic fisho, even though still quite young.
     
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  12. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    One of the many things that I have experienced over the years on more than one occasion, Noel, is "what can go wrong will go wrong", especially when it involves a fishing trip - Murphy's Law or just plain bad luck. I generally do a thorough service on the caravan or trailer at least once a year before setting off to parts unknown and you can bet your left gonad that on that rare time that I don't do it, something will go pear shaped, albeit usually something minor, but annoying just the same.

    Jeff :cool:
     
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  13. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Could write a book on such things Jeff.
     

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