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Cleaning Sunglasses and spectacle lenses.

Discussion in 'Equipment, Accessories and Maintenance' started by Bluefin, Feb 8, 2019.

  1. Bluefin

    Bluefin Well-Known Member

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    Just posted this in a thread on another site, Thought I'd share it here .

    Join Date: Dec 2002
    Location: Port Macquarie
    Posts: 256

    All lenses, Spectacle, Camera, Binocular, Phone, Sounder Screens , lap top, computer , you name it. All collect airborne dust. Add to this sweat, oily skin, salt crystals from salt water. Wiping these surfaces with any dry tissue or cloth will damage the surface, Glass is far more resistant, until you put a coating on it ! Some are softer than glass. Cr39 lenses, ( plastic ) scratches much easier than glass, Most cr39 lenses these days have a hard coating put on them to help, and it does. Polycarbonate lenses all come with a hard coat as polycarbonate scratches very easily. Glass in spectacle lenses is obsolete now, It is not as safe as cr39 or polycarb breakage wise, Impact resistant. BUT polarised glass is laminated and much safer !!! Cr39 and polycarb are 1/3 the weight also, much more comfortable. SO dry wiping is out !!!!! As I have said, the best is Cold Soapy water and a tissue. The water washes the abrasive dust off , ths soap removes any oily skin residue, and the tissue dries it. But you cant wash your binoculars, camera, lar top. Thats where the lens wipes are good, or if soapy water isn't convenient. I have used Zeiss and Specsavers, Both work well, but the Zeiss being " Alcohol " based, dries too quickly in hot weather. The " soapy " specsavers is my preference.
    The other major destroyer of Sunglass and Spectacle lenses is HEAT, And it doesn't take a lot. Left in direct sunlight on an aluminium boat, or ANYWHERE in a hot car can damage the lenses!!!!!!!.There is a small amount of pressure to hold the lenses in a frame. enough to warp the lenses if they get hot. The hard coat I spoke of can craze, orange peel effect. Especially Polycarbonate lenses.Th expensive Multicoat, which removes reflections from the lens surface making it clearer to see through, Will craze. Any thing else you want to know ?? Howard.
     
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  2. Master Baiter

    Master Baiter Well-Known Member

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    I agree with soap and water for your specs I have been doing it for years only because I couldn't be bothered to use cleaners. So when I finish shaving and before I clean the soap out of my shaving brush I dip my specs in the shave water run the shaving brush over them and let them drain while I wash my face. After drying my face and hands my specs are
    Ready to dry and clean with a tissue. They still need a huff and a puff a few times during the day though.
    Wally
     
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  3. kev209

    kev209 Well-Known Member

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    Lyn and I go to the College of Optometry in Carlton, she gets plastic lenses [multi focal]. I get multi focal lenses but because of the stigma in my left eye the Government will only pay for the glass lenses. A few years back I went to our local optometrist, I got multi focal plastic lenses, because of the stigma they used different lenses and it cost me close to $700. That was with cheap frames. I agree soap and water is the best for cleaning your glasses.
     
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  4. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I've always had trouble with scratched lenses on my specs, mainly due to the dust created with my sapphire mining and more often than not in my haste to clean them, I just wipe them with my shirt. As can be imagined, this causes more scratches, so every couple of weeks or so I polish the lenses with a diamond based paste that is widely used for removing the fine scratches on a lot of aircraft canopies to ensure a perfectly clear vision for the pilot.

    I also use the paste for removing scratches and hazing on other polycarbonate surfaces such as headlights and driving lights.

    It's good stuff, but definitely not to used on specs with any type of film coating though.

    Jeff
     
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  5. Master Baiter

    Master Baiter Well-Known Member

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    I find Specsavers lens scratch far less than OPSM and cheaper.
     
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  6. Bluefin

    Bluefin Well-Known Member

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    I have worked for both companies, The basic cr39 lens is the same quality , the hardness of the coatings may be different. Also your care may have changed.:);)o_O
     
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  7. Bluefin

    Bluefin Well-Known Member

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    Jeff, all lenses are ground and polished to an exact curve radius to give you your prescription. Polishing them your way changes the curvature of the lens and distorts the image. Also cr39 and polycarb have a hard coat to help with scratching, you would be wearing that away too. Mining is tough on Spectacles. I spent some time in Inverell and saw a lot of Sapphires. I fell in love with the gold. My wife has a 1.2 C ring I had made !!!!!! Luckily she wears gold jewelry.
     
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  8. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Howard, I've had a distorted view of the world for a long time, with or without specs. It's one of the reasons the bride and myself choose to live the lifestyle that we do, away from the hustle & bustle of mainstream Australia. I know what you mean about the exact curve radius of lenses and a pair of specs don't last me more than a year due to the way I treat them. I buy the cheapest I can get.

    Working underground on our sapphire mining claims is the harshest environment for dust because you just can't escape it, whereas once topside and processing the wash dirt it is easy to position yourself up wind out of the dust.

    Jeff
     
  9. Master Baiter

    Master Baiter Well-Known Member

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    Would clear goggles over the top work?
     
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  10. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I do wear safety goggles most of the time Wally, but the dust created by the jack-hammer is ultra fine and still coats the lenses. I also wear a respirator mask because of the high arsenic content in the dust and then with a hard hat, it is mighty uncomfortable after a few hours, but the rewards are worth it some days - helps to pay for all the fishing gear that Bender advises me to buy. :rolleyes:

    Jeff
     
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  11. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    I like the Inverell blues, far better colour than our blue stones up here, but our yellows, greens and parti-colours are the best in the world. I don't have many stones cut these days apart from something special like a pink, natural orange or parti-colour and even then I am a bit hesitant due to the changing sentiment in the market. A lot of people only want bling these days and will not pay a realistic price for a unique gemstone. Aussie buyers are far too tight-arse when it comes to investing in quality gems so I sell most of my stones on the international market.

    The stone in the pic below is the tip of a crystal weighing 12.5 carats and because of the shape, very little of the stone would be lost in the cutting process which is normally around two thirds. Being a parti-colour, it was a 'one of' type stone that could never be replicated and that bumps the value up even more. I put a price tag of $500 on it in the rough and couldn't find a buyer in Oz, so I sent it to Bangkok to be cut into a round brilliant that finished at 8 carats and it sold for $12,000 to a New York buyer without me even receiving it back into the country.

    Image3.jpg
    Jeff
     
    Last edited: Feb 10, 2019
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  12. kev209

    kev209 Well-Known Member

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    Lyn said it's beautiful, and good on ya for selling it overseas.
     
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  13. Master Baiter

    Master Baiter Well-Known Member

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    Jeff why would you worry about selling overseas if you can get a better price for it well done.
    We here in Australia cant afford to spend too much especially as pensioners on lovely things like that because all are taxes are spent stupidly by our goverments. Last year 10. something million given to Indonesia for their crisis. Indonesia has kindly helped with our flooding fires and drought etc with a generous stuff all. You and family enjoy.
    Wally
     
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  14. Bluefin

    Bluefin Well-Known Member

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    Jeff, going back 40 years , before the big players came in and took everything. Taiwanese buyers would set up in a motel in Inverell and the miners would sell to them. The deals were done over motel glasses of Cognac. From what I remember Parties weren't worth much then !!!
     
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  15. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    The thing with parti-coloured sapphires that make them unique, Howard, is that they cannot be made synthetically as they do with single colours (cubic zirconia), but wait a few more years and the Chinese will think of a way.

    The gemstone industry has become very buyer beware and it is getting harder to pick a synthetic stone from the real deal, especially when cut & polished. It is for this reason that I deal mainly in rough stone, so that a buyer can easily identify the stone as being natural.

    Jeff
     
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  16. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    Well done Jeff, That's using your head and having a go, I would love to have my own mining set up but I am past swinging about jackhammers etc.
    Am intending to do a bit of prospecting one day, found some gold when I was a kid snorkelling in a stream.

    cheers
     
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  17. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    You've just got to pace yourself, Blair. I'm nearly 70 and I can still put in a 10 hour shift underground so long as I don't go at it too hard.

    Jeff
     
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  18. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    Yes mate mate , "work smart not hard" i don't do work where you are forced to endure stuff that's not healthy, anymore. Being your own man has its be benifts I used to be a self employed tradie.
    Was working on rail last week and was getting texts at 5.00 pm "you are approaching your fatigue threshold" which I think is a good health / safety thing to do was knocking off anyway.

    keep on diggin
     
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  19. diesel

    diesel Well-Known Member

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    Blair, I spent near on 40 years as a diesel mechanic working on trucks, earth moving machinery, mining equipment and marine engines - it all took it's toll on various parts of the body, mainly joints & ligaments. There wasn't much in the way of OH&S during that time and being my own boss for the major part of it meant that I could ignore a lot of the legislative requirements that did apply to the workforce so long as the way I did things didn't affect anybody else. In hindsight, I wish that I had adopted a 'duty of care' to my own health & safety rather than the 'she'll be right' outlook.

    Would I do things differently if I could start again? Probably not - the good money I made dictated the work procedures and I guess that is why I still punish myself with sapphire mining. The old adage: 'money can't buy you happiness' is utter b/s - of course it can when you have a passion for fishing :).

    Jeff
     
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  20. reelaxation

    reelaxation Well-Known Member

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    Used to use tooth paste on lenses to remove fine scratches worked pretty good
     
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