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CornaCarpio's Carp Culling Capers!

Discussion in 'Freshwater Fishing' started by CornaCarpio, Jan 10, 2018.

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  1. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    well done cornacarpio
     
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  2. creekboy

    creekboy Well-Known Member

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    Hi, CC. Good looking spot. Cheers, Lyall.
     
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  3. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    Took a workmate from regional NSW out fishing today. I’ve been meaning to go to Coburg Lake today for a while, but have kept putting it off. Even today when I woke up and it was cloudy outside with a forecast for 18 degrees, I still wasn’t that keen. But boredom took a hold and I finally came to my senses – of course I should go fishing!

    I arranged to meet my mate at the Lake as he lives nearby. He was already there with a handline, and had been for quite some time, without any luck. I suggested we try another spot. On our bikes, we were circumnavigating the lake looking for a ‘fishy’ spot. It didn’t take long to find one. I chucked one rod in with a running sinker leaning against my bike, but took a more ‘active’ approach to my rod with a float on it. I was convinced at least one of the many Carp I could see had my name on it. After about 20 minutes of ‘chasing’ the Carp with my float, I was convinced this is exactly how Gardiners Creek is fishing at the moment – fish absolutely everywhere, but unwilling to take the bait. That was until my mate yelled out ‘Your rod, your rod’, referring to my other rod leaning up against my bike. And lucky it was, otherwise it would have ended up in the murky depths of Coburg Lake. On the end of it was a hard fighting 60cm Carp. Just as I was about to suggest another change of location!

    About 20 minutes later the same rod went again. This time the pull was even heavier and I knew I had a serious fish on. When I could actually see it, I was paranoid the line was going to break, so I took my time getting it in. It took ages. In fact, my arm was getting sore from holding the rod for so long. There was a few near misses as well. As we were fishing off a relatively steep bank, I had nowhere to beach it, so my mate actually waded in to net it with my tiny butterfly net. A few times he nearly had it before it swam off and went on another ‘run’, but eventually the beast succumbed. When I finally landed it, I couldn’t believe how big it was! Over 70cm! The very definition of a ‘big Carp’ in my book. It also had another (much bigger) hook in its mouth (along with about 1m of line), which obviously belonged to a lesser angler than myself.

    Speaking of hooks, I was using ‘circle hooks’ which I bought ages ago, but never really used them or had much luck with them. They don’t really suit my style of fishing with a float down at the creek, but I give them full marks when using a running sinker. Each fish was hooked beautifully. I know they’re only meant to ‘lip’ the fish, but the huge model absolutely inhaled his, there was no was he was getting off. It was fully embedded in his mouth.

    I was so stoked to catch a decent Carp – one the Lake is known for. I’ve tried CL once or twice in the past – seen huge fish come out of there, but never managed to do any good there – until now. Although my colleague didn’t catch anything, he played an instrumental role in helping me land all the fish. There’s a good chance the big bertha would have gotten off if he didn’t wade in with the butterfly net. I was so stoked. I finished off the day with a nice 50cm model, so all-in-all I got 1 x 48cm, 1 x 60cm, and 1x 70cm+. It was a great day fishing.

    It was good to actually go fishing and catch some decent fish. I actually had some real ‘fun’ this time. The company, and the size of the fish just added a whole new dimension. I finished the day on a high. Speaking of drugs, I often liken Carp fishing to taking drugs. Every time I go fishing for Carp (its not always good), but I'm filled with the sense of possibility. The possibility that this might be the day. The day I land a 90cm Carp, the day I land a 100cm Carp, the day I land 100 Carp. Any every time I stop fishing, I wonder what the next trip will bring...

    +3

    49704179_384495488977889_4709405256079900672_n.jpg
    The first Carp of the day came in at a respectable 60cm

    49693358_946093598913149_5344258343630274560_n.jpg
    The big bertha: A Coburg Colossus

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    This guy already had some metalwork in his mouth...

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    The two together

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    The final fish for the day...
     
    Last edited: Jan 10, 2019
  4. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    Whish I was there whith my fly rod corna, I find wide gape black magic glo bug hooks grip really well on their thick rubbery lips.
    That's a mean looking carp.
     
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  5. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    Good job! I use circle hooks on carp as well...I have found black Magic KL hooks work very well. On saying that, they are hooks I have purchased to use on other species, rather than just for carp. My idea behind using circles for carp is to make hook removal easy and quick...so I can kill more carp!

    What is the duck population like at Coburg? I have fished it twice and after the last time, vowed never to return! The bird life was too much of a hassle. I will be making the trip from Shepp to La Trobe uni at times to attend meetings (Native Fish Australia) and when the weather cools down in a few months me thinks me should try some fishing in the area. Will have to meet up with you and sort out once and for all who is the carp exterminator king! May even bring the cats!:cool:
    cheers
    Team Bender
    Can slay carp with the best of them!
     
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  6. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    The hook was absolutely embedded in the Carp's mouth - I should have taken a photo! The line went into the carps mouth and all I could see was my knot - just. Somewhere in his cheek was my hook! The other fellow's hook was on the outside of his cheek! That Carp must have had a thing for hooks...o_O

    There is a preponderance of ducks (and seagulls) at Coburg - as there are at many, if not all, urban waterways. However, using a sinker (as opposed to a float) negates a lot of the problems the birdlife bring.

    I'll take you on anywhere, any time Bender*
    *I noticed you mentioned 'when the weather cools down'. I am a 'part-time' fisherman these days - I generally pack the rods away after Easter when it starts to cool down. Although I guess an exception could me made, especially if it means defending my title of 'Chief Carp Catcher'. You can brings the cats. I haven't used cat for bait before. Will be interesting to see how it goes :p

    CornChips
    Will not be defeated!
     
  7. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    Popped down to the creek tonight afterwork. It was hard work! Carp everywhere but seemingly unwilling to take my bait. After trying the humble running sinker rig, which I had a bit of success on at Coburg, and my 'traditional' float set-up, I decided to change tack: floating bread crust. I almost got a strike straight away! The water was too dark to see the Carp, but I saw the water 'enveloping' the bread-crust, then a splash...then nothing! Feeling rather dejected, I tried another spot. More or less the same thing happened - I could see the Carp swimming towards the bread. He 'nosed' it, but didn't inhale it, like what often happens when fishing off the surface as the fish seem a little less sceptical of a piece of bread floating 'naturally' on the surface. This happened about two times before he finally 'went for it'. On the end was a modest, but respectable 38cm Carp. I was feeling mightily relieved just to catch something, as I considered going home several times during the trip.

    The only thing I can think of that would make the Carp skittish when taking bread off the surface is if they feel or 'mouth' the line, i.e the leader as opposed to the hook-bait if that makes sense...

    +1

    49666907_319481601995181_6167260436451295232_n (1).jpg

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  8. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    Carp fishing is good in winter in the hunter valley nsw near me, I am not keen on the heat in summer, I know I know I am getting soft.
    Maybe R.B has trained his cats to slip into a harness then be cast out onto the selected carp and the cat quickly sinks its teeth and claws into the target and then is wound in.
    tight lines
     
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  9. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    April or May. I am uncertain if I will get to all their meetings and my first will be in the first week of Feb! Will pm you when the time comes.
    cheers
    Team Bender
    Writing my comp winning acceptance speech already!
     
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  10. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    Popped down to the creek today for a bit of a fish. For whatever reason, I wasn't feeling confident of catching a fish at all. I noticed someone left their can of corn kernels where I set-up camp. As I haven't used corn for ages, I thought "stuff it, why not?". I loaded up my fly hook with 2 or 3 pieces of corn kernels with my float on, paying scant attention to where I cast. My diffidence was soon overcome. Within literally 90 seconds my rod headed for the water like a bull to a red rag (I wasn't paying attention to my float). On picking up my rod, I thought I had a trophy Carp on of mighty proportions. The Carp seemed to go on what felt like a 100m run. With my my reel 'zinging', the spool was down to the 'new stuff'. At one stage I honestly thought I was going to run out of line. I was praying he wouldn't get off - I'd have to replace my line! I had to wade into the centre of the creek to negate the possibility of him snagging me, and I slowly wore him down, inch by inch. When I eventually laid eyes on him, I was incredulous as to how 'small' he was. By the way he fought I thought he'd be twice that size, and a possible personal best. Nevertheless, I was very happy to get one so quick. It went a bit quiet after that and I tried a few other spots, including the spot I tried yesterday with floating bread crust, but couldn't snare another one. I had one additional bite and that was it.

    After a while I got a bit bored and scouted the creek for golf balls. I found close to 100! If anyone's into golf and is after some ethically sourced, recycled balls let me know!

    A big thank-you to whoever left the corn down at the creek! :D

    +1

    CornChips
    Ready to crush any opposition that comes my way!

    Fishing with Floats

    Float fishing can be applied to many forms of fishing. But, whenever a float is used the fishing proceeds in a tense atmosphere as the angler waits ready to strike immediately the float pops under.

    Whether it be the small boy with a bottle cork tied on a handline fishing from a wharf, or the rock fisherman with a bobby cork outfit, the float is the one small piece of equipment that can turn the period of waiting for a bite from one of boredom to one of electrified anticipation.

    In quite a number of places the float can mean the difference between a decent feed of fish and a poor catch with much lost tackle.


    From Anglers’ Omnibus, 18th Edition, Compiled and Edited by Rodger Hungerford, Budget Books, Melbourne Australia, p.48

    49900059_343654549808920_294096141836877824_n (1).jpg
    This guy fought like a steam train. One of the best fights I've ever had.
     
    Last edited: Jan 13, 2019
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  11. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    Headed down to the creek today in warm and humid conditions - in other words, ideal fishing weather! Or so I thought. The fish didn't quite seem to think so - often sniffing, then refusing my bait. I tried a few spots, and managed to entice one bite with my new favourite technique - floating bread crust - but he wasn't well hooked, gave about 3 tugs and took off.

    In a rather unfortunate instance, my phone fell out of my pocket while I was traversing the creek and fell into the water. I quickly grabbed it, but it doesn't look good. The screen went blank. I hope to God it dries out in this hot weather (tomorrow).

    On the way back, I met up with some lads I saw fishing earlier, so I decided to join them for a bit. They seem to be having the same experience as me - casting at Carp, only for them to refuse it. About to leave, I thought I'd give it one more go. I saw a largish Carp swimming in the shallows at my feet and then it took off swimming to my right (at the time, I estimated it to be about 60cm). I cast out - bread with float - 5m right in front of its swim path. Unlike every single other time today, the Carp accepted the offering, my float bobbled, and I knew I was 'on'. It gave a pretty decent account of itself (though not as furious as the one I got last time) and I was hoping to hell it wouldn't get off. I yelled out to the lads "I'm on" to which they duly offered their landing net. After a good 5 minute tussle, the Carp finally succumbed. I was so lucky to catch it. My hook was mangled (almost straightened) and my leader snapped after it was netted. I was also lucky the guys were there with a proper landing net, as opposed to my butterfly net. I was also super lucky they were there to take a photo of it. Otherwise I'd be writing this report like "I got a 74cm cm Carp down at the creek but my phone fell into the water so I didn't get a pic". Yeah right. "Photos or or didn't happen" Am I right? :rolleyes:

    I haven't caught a heap of Carp this year, but have been quite successful in getting a few 70cm+ models - something I have traditionally struggled with. Looking back, I seem to have had more luck with the bigger models since I've been rolling with the 4000 sized reels. Fishing light is all good and well, but I think with big Carp, you're stacking the odds in their favour if you use too light a gear, something which I'm no longer a fan of.

    CC
    Likes stacking the odds in MY favour!

    +1

    50035296_562821227517447_7364728332534939648_n (1).jpg
    A very respectable 74cm male Carp. Pic taken by a fellow angler.
     
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  12. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    It is a fine balancing act when choosing what line to use. Go to light and the risk of losing the fish increases. Go to heavy and you will experience less hook ups. The larger carp we target are smart...they will avoid baits presented on heavy line.
    Cheers
    Team Bender
    Thinks it is about time CC gets a proper fold up landing net to carry on his bike!
     
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  13. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    When fishing from bank I sometimes use a dowel stick approx. 2 meters long whith 2 large hooks bound to it, crushed barbs, a lightweight gaff.works well.
    blair
     
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  14. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    Headed to Mansfield for the weekend for a funeral. It's become a bit of a joke with the family that we only visit when there's a funeral. Unfortunately, there's a kernel of truth in every joke.

    On the way there (Thursday), we stopped by Bonnie Doon for the obligatory 'fish-before-we-arrive'. We only stayed for about 30 minutes, as my Dad was in a bit of a hurry to get there after our journey from the other side of the state. Virtually as soon as put my rod in (loaded with corn) I got tugged off big-time. My recent run of slaying 70cm Carp had come to a halt. I had no doubt at all this unit would have been (well) above 70cms. When I reeled in the other rod - loaded with chicken - there was a dead Redfin on there. It tried to devour the bait that was almost as large as it was. Wasn't even big enough to move the rod.

    The next day after funeral proceedings (Friday), I headed around to nearby Goughs Bay on Lake Eildon. I've been told this isn't necessarily the best place to fish, but being unfamiliar with the area, and being so close by, I decided to give it a go. After a bit of a wait, I got 2 Carp - 1 x 48cm and 1 x 28cm.

    On Saturday, I went for a drive to try and find somewhere 'new' and decent to fish. I was told there was good fishing up near Jamison on the Lake (Howqua Arm?). Again, being unfamiliar with the area I couldn't really find anywhere. I drove to Jamison, saw the river, but did a U-bolt back. I turned left somewhere hoping to find the Lake (all the roads seemed to be marked 'no access to water') but found a river (which I think turned out to be the Goulburn). I tied a lure on and went spinning for a while, hoping to catch a Trout, but kept spotting Carp everywhere. Also, walking along the bank was a pain the arse as I kept sinking down in mud up to my knees. Keen to find somewhere to sit down and fish, I headed back to Goughs Bay. After waiting very patiently, I eventually got one nearly the exact same size as the night before in the same spot.

    After returning to the family farm and a bit of research on the internets, I found out that the Howqua River, which I drove past, it is a bit of a Trout angling mecca. I didn't give it a second thought driving over it (despite someone telling me to give it a go) as it looked rather shallow and nondescript from the bridge. Thinking I would kick myself if I didn't at least give it a go, while we came all this way (not to mention staying about 15 minutes from there) I arranged with my Dad to take the car before we leave for a quick fish.

    I'll put my brief trip to the Howqua River today in a seperate post, just to break it up a bit (and because the past few days have all been a bit of a blur). Spoiler alert - I didn't catch anything.

    +3

    Foreword

    For all fishermen there is a tradition of males getting together at fishing camps or launch parties at weekends, and heightening the pleasure of their fishing with conviviality and the telling of tall tales. Even people who don’t go fishing like to know about fish and their environment.


    From the Encyclopedia of Australian Fishing (1979), Bay Books Pty. Ltd.,157-167 Bayswater Rd, Rushcutters Bay, NSW vol 1, p.1



    49664761_531492750693363_6166447867293597696_n (1).jpg
    First Carp of the trip - 48cm (approx) taken at Goughs Bay

    50682889_802508693426271_2918098804940996608_n (1).jpg

    Second Carp of the trip

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    3rd Carp of the trip

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    1st v. 3rd Carp, one day apart

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    Sunset overlooking Goughs Bay
     
    Last edited: Jan 20, 2019
  15. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    On Sunday, I headed to the Howqua River. Excited at the prospect of catching my first Trout for a while, I tied on a lure and headed straight under the bridge. After a few casts, I noticed a fish tentatively follow my lure. "OMG! A Trout" I thought. On closer inspection, it was a bloody Carp! Feeling dejected, I moved downstream, wading from hole to hole. The process would repeat: spot a fish - Carp, spot a fish - Carp. In nearly every hole above knee-deep there was a Carp. As much as I love catching Carp, they don't belong in such a beautiful mountain stream. It really was a shame to seem them in the crystal clear shallow water. Figuring that a Trout was now very unlikely, I headed back to the car and swapped a lure for a hook - loaded with 3 corn kernels. If you can't beat 'em, join 'em, right? I had a feeling I might clean up here, thinking it would be like shooting a fish in a barrel, but it was not to be. Actively feeding Carp were 'actively' avoiding my bait - never a good sign! I'm not sure if it was the crystal clear water that makes them ultra skittish, or whether it was the sunscreen I applied before, but despite seeing plenty of Carp, I couldn't tempt one.

    I headed back under the bridge to do some 'sit down' fishing, but a change in fortune didn't materialise. A Howqua River Carp (or Trout) is still on the 'to-do' list!

    50418375_295727241294358_5537203517405528064_n.jpg 50606711_309945239657538_4441196458389012480_n.jpg 50628664_227850674763437_1943668676502749184_n.jpg 50667356_447415315793641_5926575296726695936_n.jpg
     
  16. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    Things change...I have heard it mentioned at trout conferences that the streams are being overun with carp. This would certainly be applicable to the lower reaches of many streams.

    The heat would not help either! Options...try it during a cooler period or go further upstream...or both!
    Cheers
    Team Bender
    Troutologist!
     
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  17. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    Headed to a dam that is very close by today for a quick flick. Got a little and slightly deformed Redfin.

    51019930_388494991927031_3904868236981698560_n.jpg
     
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  18. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    looks like somethings had a chew on it at some stage.
     
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  19. CornaCarpio

    CornaCarpio Well-Known Member

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    Headed to Cato Lake today in the township of Stawell for a quick flick. Tied on a lure and did a quick lap of the lake (as I have been doing for most days this week), not really sure of the target species in mind - a suicidal Redfin I suppose. As I nearly completed a lap of the lake I saw a huge fish - a Carp - probably 15lb in the old scale and 70cm+ in the new. I raced home on foot to grab a can of corn and the 'carp rods'. Headed back down with motor vehicle and landing net, brag mat, etc in tow. Naturally, the fish I saw had disappeared, but I was semi-confident of getting at least one. About 50mins - 60mins in I saw a Carp appear - a bit smaller than the one I sighted before, fairly close to shore, so I chucked my float at it. I saw my float 'take-off', but when I lifted the rod, nothing was there. I got a few more nibbles, but couldn't manage to hook anything.

    Eventually my rod with a couple of split-shot and a hook 'went'. As I picked it up, I thought 'this must be a small Carp'. It wasn't until it came closer I realised it was a (stocked) Rainbow Trout! A nice little by-catch and my first Trout in God knows how long. Unfortunately he didn't last too long in the heat out of the water while I was taking pics, so I gutted it straight away and took it home.

    I came back determined to catch a Carp, but didn't even get a bite during my third session - maybe it was too hot - even for the Carp.

    All in all, I was pretty pleased to catch a Trout, even if it was a stocked-version in a family friendly fishing lake. When I was a kid, I often thought of Trout as being a 'cold-weather' fish, but nearly all the Trout I've caught have been in the height of summer! Its even got me wondering if the same spots and techniques I used out at Lake Bellfield nearly 10 years ago when I was in a 'Trout catching' phase still work all these years later. I even managed to 'bag-out' a few times out there. Also, it seems the Trout in Cato have 'grown'. I remember one school holidays when they stocked it, kids were catching Rainbows about half the size of my one, maybe this one is an 'old stocking'. I am a bit surprised they do survive in there, as the Lake seems quite shallow and devoid of any structure. Can't imagine it would be too pleasant for them on a day like today.

    There's also a bit of irony in today's catch in the sense that I've just come from 'high-country' which is considered the pinnacle of Trout fishing in Victoria, to one of the driest parts of the state...

    +1

    Trout, Rainbow


    Like the brown trout, the rainbow was introduced from overseas – in this case, North America. It shares similar growth potential with the brown, but is a faster grower and is therefore more popular with those who stock dams and reservoirs.

    It prefers cooler waters than the brown and is generally regarded as an easy fish to catch. In Australia it is found in all southern states, but only breeds naturally in New South Wales, Victoria and Tasmania. Rainbow populations in South Australia rely on artificial stocking programs.

    Rainbow trout are spectacular aerialists when hooked, often leaping several timesin an attempt to throw the lure or fly. In fast flowing rivers a large specimen can be difficult to subdue on light tackle.

    From Rex Hunt’s Fishing World (1993), Crossbow Publishing Pty. Ltd., Level 3, 150 Jolimont Rd, Jolimont, Vic. 3002, p.46

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    Nice little 'bow of 34cm
     
    Last edited: Jan 25, 2019
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  20. blair

    blair Well-Known Member

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    Always nice to get a non target quality fish caught a cod once while chasing carp.
    cheers
     
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