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FISH PICS (AKA SKITING)

Discussion in 'Chewing the fat' started by Old fisho, Sep 11, 2019.

  1. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Loading a rod into a big flattie.
    had a coffee and lost the plot (and pic). Reinserting image in next post.



    What it looked like a bit later.
    Might have been 93 but not certain
    Image118TBX.jpg
     

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    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
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  2. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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  3. Chili

    Chili Well-Known Member

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    Costly, but an exceptional specimen of a trout and was well done.
     
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  4. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    When I read that I thought you meant that you had a coffee during the fight! :cool: I may have done that before with a carp on light line (4lb mono) in the open waters of Waranga Basin..can't rush these things!

    I have never caught a saltwater fish in my life with a few attempts at them. It has always been one of my goals. With flathead, what would you say is the most important aspect in chasing them? I have done some research on them.
    cheers
    Team Bender
    Next time he hooks a giant carp...will order in pizza to eat during the fight!
     
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  5. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    The Kiwis are proud of their taxidermy skills and reputations. They also get plenty of practice. The guy who did that one, reputedly the best on the North Island, told us it takes most of a day to skin a fish like that. I didn't believe him until he explained that it's painstakingly slow as there is not permitted even a minor error during the cutting. There's no peeling. They have to cut with a razor sharp knife all the way. Guys can spend many thousands coming from all over the world; catch their dream once in a lifetime fish and then the taxidermist tells him he stuffed it by cutting a hole in it. No way he said.
    I think they reuse the actual skin and it's filled with expanding foam. I said 'I think'.
    We're all entitled to one grand fish in a lifetime. I rate that one above my first marlin.
    Noel
     
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  6. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Bender, I'm not big on theories, really, so I don't spend much time on research. I'd rather spend the time catching fish.
    Catching a flathead (big or small) and I've had plenty of small ones, like other fish, has to begin by going fishing.
    The more often people go, the more they catch and the closer they get to landing that big one.
    To catch a flathead:
    Look at the fish. If you don't have one, look at a picture and consider this combination of elements.
    1. The shape tells you they live at the bottom of the water table.
    2. The eyes confirm this as they are high on the head to see upward.
    3. Look at the size of the mouth. It's designed to grab and quickly.
    4. The front teeth of the top jaw are in the extreme front of the mouth to grab and to hold on.
    5. They have very large gills for a fish people that think lie on the bottom all day. (a big mistake)
    6. Their pectoral fins are not long but broad and strong to give them a fast take off.
    There are others but these give the general picture.
    Sum up those first few features and there's only one answer:
    The humble flathead is among the most efficiently designed predators in the sea.
    Remember here that dusky flathead that we target in estuaries, never goes to sea like tiger and sand flathead. They live and breed in the estuary.
    They are caught on still baits but not reliably or consistently. They do spend some time hiding in sand and mud but they also hunt and move around the estuaries. They are often found in shallow water; I think more in the mornings, having been in there at night hunting. They lie on drop offs when the tide runs out and baitfish are carried over their heads by tide flow.
    When a flathead decides it's tucker time; look out anything that passes over its head. They are equipped for the job and from a standing start, they are one of the fastest fish in water. After that it's jokingly said that we could catch them. I doubt that. They have bigger eyes than some fish and I have, in knee deep water, seen one travel about eight metres to grab a plastic and it did.
    Catching flatties on 20lb line has little joy. The way we fish, it can be exciting, challenging and at time; bloody hopeless. When they're off; they're off.
    Summary: Analyse the above and there's two blatantly obvious things to concentrate on. They are killers and nothing will move them better than a moving bait. Hence plastics have revolutionised estuary fishing and it didn't take long for guys to begin chasing other species using the same gear but with slightly changed techniques.
    Noel
    There ain't no bleedin' secrets left.
     
  7. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Something especially for Team Bender:
    These pics are of what I call flathead shadows. They are lies where the fish have been, particularly during calm summer nights, assumedly hunting prawns. These were photographed in water less than ten centimetres deep and they were less than half a metre from the sand. I have been there at 3.00 o'clock in the morning but have never
    found them there.
    . IMG_1420TBX.jpg



    IMG_1423TBX.jpg
    We often spook them with the boat right at the edge, so they are not afraid to go shallow. Most of these fish were 40-45 long but we've seen lies that measured up to 90 at times.




    IMG_1427TBX.jpg

    We have seen over twenty some morning in about a 50metre section of sand.
    Noel.
    Even less secrets now.
    For Bender the knowledgeable
     
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  8. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    Thanks for the detailed response Noel! If you are ever feeling bored, I am sure members would appreciate a thread from you going into specific details of other species. It makes sense what you said before, get out there and have a go and learn, but us beginners need a starting point and you have certainly given a good one here!

    The place I intend visiting at some point certainly has its fair share of sand! Lacks other structure though!
    Werribee mouth.PNG
    cheers
    Team Bender
    Um, er, I got nothin'!:eek:
     
    Last edited: Sep 15, 2019
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  9. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Thank you Jim. That's most kind.
    I do get bored now and then but try to go fishing before it becomes serious.
    I often wonder how many comprise your 'team' and whether one of them has a boat.
    When you speak of structures; I shall assume you mean as under water. I have read that people chasing flatties look for gravelly bottom ground but think that may be for sandies or tigers offshore as a preference to rocks and reefs. I'm fairly fixed with the belief that these guys much prefer a mud and sand place to hang out. As the pics show; they can dig right in until only their eyes are visible. Difficult in hard ground.
    We grew up in Western Vic, not far from Colac and have family in Geelong, Colac and Werribee but have never fished the Werribee area so have no knowledge. The pic you show looks commercialised and populated; not my favourite sort of place. A guy that worked for me a few years ago used to dive in Port P Bay and said it was now barren in fish terms.
    Our lake has little access other than by boat. There are no roads and the shoreline is mud and mangroves. We also have mud crabs. Proof that flathead move around is a simple thing. You caught fish here yesterday but may not get another there for weeks. They sometimes have to be found first and we are happy to search.
    If it might help achieve your dream of catching a fish from the salt, we have a private residence that doubles at times as a free motel for fishers. The tucker's good and the wine cellar is OK too. The Old fisho is head chef of what is locally nicknamed Chez 7; our street number. An old but purpose built vessel sits in the yard sometimes. Other times it's on the water. It was rebuilt for here and it works.
    Noel
    The ever hospitable.
     
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  10. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Here's a couple more decent lizards from Tuross.
    This was caught by my mad mate and returned.

    He desperately wanted to keep it. He has a table built with a glass top and wanted two big flatties
    to have mounted and on sand beneath the glass. he finally gave in and returned it.

    P1010119TBX.jpg Photo0040TBX.jpg

    A really fat old lady and that's not being sexist, age or weight shaming. It's a great compliment.
    Don't get the wrong idea. We don't get these every day. Sometimes there's a long wait for the next biggie but it's worth it.
    Noel
    Still dreaming of an even bigger one.
     
    Last edited: Sep 16, 2019
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  11. Chili

    Chili Well-Known Member

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    I know some guys from Melb that fish around the Newport (now called warmies, used to be called Hotties) Sometimes they fish in the Warmies lagoon itself and sometimes the rocks in the river side just near it. They catch flatties, not as big as Fishoes, pinkies and some good size bream. Tailor and Trevally at times too. The Bay has picked right up in the past several years they reckon. Webb dock is good too. If you fish at night you have every chance at good snapper and mulloway. To give an idea how well it picked up after they stopped the trawlers, its not unusual to see when its king fish season, some in the Melbourne Docklands area. Due also to current temp chang in recent years Dolphin fish have been showing up in the bay in places. There was even a confirmed report of a cobia.
    https://vfa.vic.gov.au/education/featured/teachers-resource/climate-change-fishing-change
     
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  12. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Sounds good to me. Had no idea.
    Thanks
    Noel
     
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