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Talk Wild Trout 2018 (Vic)

Discussion in 'Fishing in Victoria' started by Rod Bender, May 7, 2018.

  1. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    Hi all
    I was surprised to get an email today from Victorian fisheries. The 'Talk Wild Trout' conference is in August...3 months earlier than last year. The venue has also been changed from Mansfield to Preston (Melbourne). I am not sure why the event has been brought forward or the venue changed but I wonder if it had anything to do with us sitting in the Mansfield venue on a hot November day last year with the fkn air-con not being able to cope!

    Anyway, Team Bender has registered and should be going if all goes to plan. Here is the link.
    https://vfa.vic.gov.au/recreational-fishing/talk-wild-trout-2018
    cheers
    Team Trout
     
  2. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    I won't be going but will be interested in the outcome. Noel.
     
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  3. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    I received an email yesterday...all seats are booked! Two weeks to go now!
    cheers
    Jim
     
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  4. creekboy

    creekboy Well-Known Member

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    Preston is only 10 minutes away from me, but I shall stay at home and wait for your report,Jim. Cheers, Lyall.
     
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  5. creekboy

    creekboy Well-Known Member

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    Hi, Jim. Did you get my PM yesterday? Cheers, Lyall.
     
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  6. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    That was fun! Made the trip to Preston yesterday.

    The opening speaker, Jim Fredericks, Chief of Fisheries, Idaho Department of Fish and Game was my favorite for the day. He outlined the the aims of his department and one of them is that native fish take priority over non-native fish. They have introduced species of trout there as well as native Cutthroat and Rainbow trout. Introduced trout include browns and brooks.

    The Cutthroat trout numbers are limited in one water system which has been overrun by rainbows which are also native. Part of a solution, install a fish ladder which results in any rainbows trying to pass through being removed by by hand and the fish are relocated. Only the desired species, the cutthroats, are allowed to pass though to spawn. This method is very labor intensive! Another method used to reduce the rainbow population is to encourage anglers not to return them!

    When they stock trout into waters to support a wild population, they try and stock sterile fish so they will not breed and therefore affect the integrity of the wild trout genetic integrity.

    Fisheries scientists provided reports on six wild trout streams in Victoria. These reports are based on results from electro-fishing amongst other things. Aspects looked at include fish numbers per 100 metres and the age of fish as in, did they spawn in the previous year and are larger models that make good targets for anglers present. The six rivers surveyed: the upper Goulburn, Howqua, Buckland, Jamieson, King and Traralgon Creek were all rated as being from 'good' to 'excellent'. In previous years some rivers were rated as poor so there has been improvement. The largest brown measured came out of the Buckland River and it was 54 cm's. The highest average of length (for browns) came out of the Howqua...17 cm's was the average. Not that long but reality is the electro-fishing process will raise the majority of fish, including ones that spawned maybe 8 months prior so this will bring the average down.

    Another presenter gave a report on fish stocking in the rivers. In a nutshell, it doesn't seem to work as when fisheries revisit a stocked site with the electro-fishing gear they find very few of the stocked fish. To the point where the number found can be counted with your fingers! This problem has been raised before. They are trialing a system where trout eggs are placed in incubators (plastic containers which have very small compartments which hold individual eggs) which are then placed in steams. It is a rather labor intensive job to do this and much of the work is done by volunteers. It is too early to determine if this method is effective.

    A prominent member of the public suggested that the trout season should be started earlier. The response...no! It is a balancing act and there are other people that believe the trout should not have a closed season at all. The fisheries response was worded better but that is what they meant.

    Presenters discussed what has been discussed before...global warming is going to reduce the area of the wild trout streams and we need to do more for stream habitat.

    The last session of the day is the part I normally look forward to...the talks about different aspects of trout fishing looking at techniques etc. The best one as far as I was concerned was the last presentation of the day by Philip Weigall. The talk was basically ten tips to improve your fly fishing. I do not fly fish but intend to take it up at some point. However, some of the points were relevant to any type of fishing. The tip I found most interesting came under the title...'Land the fish'. As he started talking about this point, he suggested that if anyone in the audience likes being 'broken off' or don't care about being 'broken off', it was time to turn off and have a quick nap while he discussed this point!

    His message was that he finds it amazing how some anglers are totally 'under gunned' for the fish they are chasing! Rather than using the lightest line you can get away with...have a think about using the heaviest line you can get away with, as in a heavier line that will not spook the fish in the conditions but put you in with a chance of holding onto that fish! He was not suggesting you use gear that you can skull drag the fish out...but gear that will put you in good stead if you hook that trophy trout that you have always been pursuing.

    Other things to come out were, fisheries are looking at establishing a hatchery to breed natives in north west Victoria. Fisheries are concerned that a lot of anglers are changing their opinion on the release of the carp virus. This is based on a campaign by anti - virus organisations.

    Anyway, that is all I got! Bring on 2019!
    cheers
    Jim
     
    Last edited: Aug 12, 2018
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  7. kev209

    kev209 Well-Known Member

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    Good report Jim. I read an article that states in the UK the virus was introduced to private lakes via keep nets and landing nets.
     
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  8. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Jim, Good stuff with some common sense included.
     
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  9. Rod Bender

    Rod Bender Well-Known Member

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    I shared this article a while ago Kev. Research from the UK trying to determine if nets spread the virus. You haven't got this mixed up have you?
    https://marinescience.blog.gov.uk/2016/07/01/khv-fishery-angler-net-equipment/

    Yes...but unfortunately some of the die hard trout fishos present can not grasp this! They hate redfin, although this wasn't discussed on the day. Redfin eat trout fry so redfin are bad. The fact that the redfin are introduced, like trout are just does not matter! They complain about the loss of trout waters...some of the smaller creeks on lower lying areas do not produce any more. The people complaining that fisheries do not do enough are oblivious to the fact that summers are getting warmer. Mind you, there have been some colossal stuff ups by parks management when they decided to eradicate willows. Fair enough but instead of doing it bit by bit, they did it in large sections leaving many kilometres of streams without shade.
    cheers
    Jim
     
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  10. Old fisho

    Old fisho Well-Known Member

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    Jim, I know you are correct about the 'willows' stuff up warming our streams, but it's only part of the problem. Another issue to many minds is that the streams lost were affected more by lack of water than by warming of what they had. As a subsequence; numerous once proud trout streams no longer carry water to be warmed up. They are sand and gravel beds. Many grow grass much of the year and we can't deny it. The warming effect was exacerbated by the reduced volume. Much of that loss is caused by the massive numbers of hobby farm dams we see today. It's easy for some to say the dams make no difference as when they flow over, the surplus the water takes it's natural course. But for every time they flow over; they are 'topped' up many times. None of that water takes its natural course to creeks, rivers, and most never reaches the estuaries. That in turn affects fish, birds, animals, and the habitat in general. In for two bob. Noel
     
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  11. creekboy

    creekboy Well-Known Member

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    Hi, Jim. An excellent report and some very good replies as well. Cheers, Lyall.
     
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